Arts

Phoenix Steak

Wall Painting at the Pheonix Steak restaurant in #Changchun #China  Beautiful #artūüé® – I liked it!

Juilliard School’s Tianjin campus to open in 2018

“Juilliard School’s Tianjin campus to open in 2018”

via “Xinhua.net

BEIJING, Oct. 5 (Xinhuanet) — New York’s renowned Juilliard School will launch its first overseas campus to offer graduate courses in music in the northern Chinese municipality of Tianjin by 2018.

Sources with the administrative commission of Tianjin Binhai New District said on Friday that the Juilliard School’s Tianjin branch will be established in Yujiapu Financial District.

Approved by the Chinese Ministry of Education, the school’s branch in Tianjin will collaborate with the Tianjin Conservatory of Music as well as the Tianjin Innovative Finance Investment Co. Ltd. and the Tianjin Municipal Education Commission to offer graduate courses in music.

The master’s degree to be awarded by the Juilliard school’s Tianjin branch will be accredited in the United States. The partnership will be the first such collaboration between Chinese and foreign conservatories.

Chinese First Lady Peng Liyuan accompanied Chinese President Xi Jinping on a state visit to the United States and on Monday visited the Juilliard School at its Lincoln Center campus, where she attended a performance class and the inauguration of the school’s branch at the Tianjin Conservatory of Music.

She encouraged students from both countries to learn from and communicate more with each other.

The Juilliard School was founded in 1905, and its alumni have collectively won more than 105 Grammy Awards, 62 Tony Awards and 47 Emmy Awards.

Yujiapu Financial District, where Juilliard’s branch will be established in Tianjin, has been approved to use 3.86 square km of land. The municipal government hopes to turn the area into a world-class financial center within 10 years. . . . .

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Art Law Rising

“Art Law Rising”

by Robert Milburn via “Barron’s”

The fast-growing and unregulated art market, invaded by art-collecting novices, has already seen a proliferation of hand-holding art advisors. Now we are seeing a new art advisor enter the market: specialist lawyers helping to settle ownership, copyright and authenticity disputes.

‚ÄúEven people that have experience make common mistakes,‚ÄĚ says Brian Kerr, partner at the recently launched art law firm Spencer Kerr. ‚ÄúThe works being sold are of staggering value so the stakes are just too high.‚ÄĚ That‚Äôs precisely when people reach for their lawyers.

Getty Images

Ronald Perelman purchased Popeye, by artist Jeff Koons, from Larry Gagosian.

Consider billionaire art collector Ronald Perelman, who sued fabled art dealer Larry Gagosian, claiming Gagosian ‚Äútook advantage of his position of trust‚ÄĚ and misrepresented the value of certain works. According to the lawsuit, Gagosian overvalued works sold to Perelman and undervalued pieces it bought from the collector. Among the works changing hands were sculptures by Jeff Koons and Richard Serra and paintings by Cy Twombly. In December, Perelman lost in an appeal with a five-judge panel essentially ruling that the sophisticated collector could have conducted his own due diligence.

Kerr represented London-based filmmaker Joe Simon-Whelan, in 2009, against the Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Simon-Whelan purchased a Warhol silkscreen self-portrait for $195,000 in 1989, which back then was deemed genuine by the foundation. He resubmitted it to the foundation for authentication, in 2001 and 2003, just before an anticipated $2 million sale, and this time the work was twice branded a fake.

In the end, the Warhol foundation spent $7 million on its defense. Simon-Whelan eventually folded and was awarded nothing, claiming he was ‚Äúdeeply saddened‚ÄĚ about being ‚Äúunable to reveal the truth in court, but faced with bankruptcy, continuing personal attacks and counterclaims, I realized I no longer stood a chance of proceeding further.‚ÄĚ Shortly thereafter, in 2012, the Warhol authentication board was disbanded.

Much of Kerr’s current work involves helping shell-shocked collectors recover scraps from among the emotional and financial wreckage, after purchasing a fake. But the law firm is also connecting its previously-burned clients with outside consultants and art advisors to help them establish clear provenance and authenticity before they buy new work.

‚ÄúThe goal is that when [clients] stick up their hand at an auction or buy from a gallery, that the legal side and consulting work is done hand-in-hand,‚ÄĚ Kerr says. He adds that the consultants bill separately for their services and the law firm collects no fee for referring the business.

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Coming Exhibition: Future Returns

“Future Returns: Contemporary Art from China”

08 Jin Yangping, ‚ÄúThe Mirror of City No.1‚ÄĚ, oil on canvas, 200 x 265 cm, 2011

Who:  

Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum

Michigan State University

When: Oct. 28, 2014 РMarch 8, 2015 (Hours Vary)

Where: 

Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum
547 East Circle Drive
East Lansing, Michigan 48824

More Information: Here and Here.

Over the past three decades China has experienced profound socioeconomic changes that have prompted calls to revisit, reconsider, and redefine the nation’s identity. Although there remains a strong local understanding of Chinese history and heritage, the homogenization of the country’s urban geography and the rapid dissipation of rural life have dramatically altered the cultural landscape. Future Returns: Contemporary Art from China explores the impact of these transformations by bringing together works by contemporary Chinese artists that address China’s metamorphosis from a traditional society into an ultra-modern nation-state.

The pertinent question in today‚Äôs China is whether the country‚Äôs distinct traditions and values can continue to play a role in its development. The future of China cannot be predicted, yet the psychology of ‚Äúchange, change, change‚ÄĚ that pervades the everyday lives of the Chinese allows for a multitude of possibilities. Only in the pursuit of these new potentialities will China be able to build on its distinctive culture. The focused selection of paintings, photographs, installations, and digital art in this exhibition showcases the vision of both emergent and established practitioners who have contributed to China‚Äôs celebrated artistic community. Through their works, Future Returns highlights the emergence of a new China, one that is not constrained by closed readings of the past.

Artists and filmmakers featured in the exhibition include: Chen Weiqun, Dong Jun, Geng Yi, He Yunchang, Jiang Ji An, Jin Yangping, Jizi, Li Junhu, Lin Xin, Liu Lining, Meng Baishen, Miao Xiaochun, Pei Li, Qu Yan, Sui Jianguo, Su Xinping, Tian Bo, Wang Chuan, Wang Huangsheng, Wang Yang, Xia Xiaowan, Xu Bing, Zhang Yanfeng, Zhou Gang, and Zhou Qinshan.

Coming Exhibition: Collecting Asian Objects in Colonial Korea, 1910-1945

“Collecting Asian Objects in Colonial Korea, 1910-1945”

Lady riding a horse, Astana Tombs, Turpan, 7th-8th century, color on clay, 38.5cm high.

Who:  

National Museum of Korea

When: Oct. 28, 2014 РJanuary 11, 2015 (Hours Vary)

Where: 

National Museum of Korea
137, Seoubinggo-ro (168-6, Yongsan-dong 6-ga)
Yongsan-gu, Seoul 140-797

More Information: Here and Here.

In the late nineteenth century, as Western powers expanded deeper into Asia, the cultures of the East were eagerly commodified to satisfy westerners‚Äô penchant for the exotic. Tomb thefts were just as prevalent as legitimate archeological investigations. With the concurrent boom in the antique market, the acquired artifacts were smoothly incorporated into the category of ‚Äėfine arts‚Äô.
At the center of this movement were museums established through the emergence of modern states. Korea, however, was unable to play a leading role in the current of this era. At the time, Japan regarded itself as the only civilized country in Asia, and thus the only country capable of leading the primitive East into modern civilization. Based on this belief, Japan re-interpreted the histories of other Asian countries from its own perspective and attempted to promote these historical revisions through museums.
Notably, the so-called cultural assets collected in museums at that time originated from all across Asia, ranging from Central Asia to China and Japan. Why did Japan collect cultural assets from other Asian countries under its colonial rule? This exhibition represents the first step of a long journey that will yield both a question and a corresponding answer about our museum’s collection of Asian cultural assets and its origins.