Chinese painting

Chinese Artist: Chang Dai-Chien

“Splashed Color Landscape” by Daiqien (1965)

Artists

Chang Dai-Chien (Zhang Daqian) was an outrageously popular and eclectic 20th Century Chinese artist and forger.  Born in the Sichuan province, he initially studied art under his mother.  In those early days, he began with outline drawings of animals and flowers ~ subjects he would perfect through the years.  As a young man, he studied painting, weaving, and textile dying and design in Japan.  Upon returning to China, he began studying and replication several 17th century Chinese calligraphers and painters.  He earned his money selling these and his own works for some time.  Although he would eventually travel around quite a bit, watching and learning from artists around the world, his style was eminently Chinese.   That said, he earned a reputation for incorporating Brazilian and American techniques into his work, thus introducing new concepts of “Chinese” art. (more…)

Forging an Art Market in China

“Forging an Art Market in China”

by David Barboza, Graham Bowley and Amanda Cox via “The New York Times”

“When the hammer came down at an evening auction during China Guardian’s spring sale in May 2011, “Eagle Standing on a Pine Tree,” a 1946 ink painting by Qi Baishi, one of China’s 20th-century masters, had drawn a startling price: $65.4 million. No Chinese painting had ever fetched so much at auction, and, by the end of the year, the sale appeared to have global implications, helping China surpass the United States as the world’s biggest art and auction market.

But two years after the auction,  . . . “

 

“Chinese Painting”

“Chinese Painting”

via the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Chinese way of appreciating a painting is often expressed by the words du hua, “to read a painting.” How does one do that? 

Consider Night-Shining White by Han Gan (1977.78), an image of a horse. Originally little more than a foot square, it is now mounted as a handscroll that is twenty feet long as a result of the myriad inscriptions and seals (marks of ownership) that have been added over the centuries, some directly on the painted surface, so that the horse is all but overwhelmed by this enthusiastic display of appreciation. Miraculously, the animal’s energy shines . . . .”