Crime

“Italy Heritage Sleuths Launch Stolen Art App”

“Italy Heritage Sleuths Launch Stolen Art App” 

by AFP via “France 24”

Italy's top art detectives, global experts in finding stolen works, launched a smartphone app Wednesday to get people to collaborate on cracking crimesItaly's top art detectives, global experts in finding stolen works, launched a smartphone app Wednesday to get people to collaborate on cracking crimes

“Italy’s top art detectives, global experts in finding stolen works, launched a smartphone app Wednesday to get people to collaborate on cracking crimes.

The application, which will be available to download from AndroidMarket and AppleStore soon, was “thought up and created for citizens”, according to Mariano Mossa, the head of Italy’s heritage police.

“It represents a first for those who hope to contribute to the fight against heritage crimes,” he said at a press presentation of the new app.

Users who come across works of art they suspect have been stolen can take a photograph of it and send it straight to the police, who check in real time whether it matches any of the works in their archives. (more…)

“French police recover painting by Rembrandt (or in the style of Rembrandt) stolen in 1999 from the municipal museum in Draguignan”

French police recover painting by Rembrandt (or in the style of Rembrandt) stolen in 1999 from the municipal museum in Draguignan

Via ArtCrime.Blogspot

“Journalist Vincent Noce reports in the French newspaper, Liberation, that a Rembrandt painting stolen in 1999 has been recovered in Nice (“Un Rembrandt volé en 1999 e été retrouvé à nice, 19 March 2014) although the thieves may have discovered the work was not by the ‘genius from Amsterdam’.
Noce reported that Tuesday afternoon French police from the unit assigned to fighting trafficking in cultural goods (OCBC) arrested two men (ages 44 and 51 years old) for trying to sell a painting stolen 15 years ago from the municipal museum in Draguignan in southeastern France. The oil painting, measuring 60 cm by 50, is attributed to Rembrandt and known as “Child with a Soap Bubble”. According to Noce’s article, the recovered painting has an estimated value of 4 million euros (U.S. $5.56 million) — if it is indeed by the Dutch master and not by an artist inspired by Rembrandt. According to the article, the museum’s inventory shows that the painting was taken from the Château de Valbelle [now in ruins] in Tourves during the revolution in 1794. 
Sophie Legras, writing for L’Agence France-Presse (AFP) and published in Le Figaro, reports that judicial police in Nice helped the OCBC in recovering the painting . . . . .”

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“Arson Engulfs Art at Detroit’s Heidelberg Project”

“Arson Engulfs Art at Detroit’s Heidelberg Project”

via “Fox News

“On Detroit’s Heidelberg Street, where a local artist turned the shell of a crime-ridden neighborhood into an interactive public art project, visitors coming to see offbeat display are noticing something that’s not part of the quirky exhibition: Yellow fire tape.

There have been at least eight fires since early May– the latest last Sunday — leading to questions about who might be targeting the installation known as the Heidelberg Project, and why they want to burn it down. . . .”

“More than £300m of Art Being Stolen in Britain Each Year”

“More than £300m of Art Being Stolen in Britain Each Year”

By Graeme Paton via “The Telegraph

“Theft of art and antiques is now second only to drug dealing as the most lucrative trade for organised criminal gangs across the UK, according to senior police officers.  More than £300 million of art is being stolen each year amid an escalating criminal trade in paintings and antiques, it has emerged. Thieves often target works on display in museums, libraries, archives and private collections and have been known to use extreme violence,the BBC reported. In one case last year, a rare medieval jug was stolen from a high-security display cabinet at a museum in Luton. The Wenlok jug – worth £750,000 – was eventually recovered and a man was jailed for more than two years for