Deities

Coming Exhibition: Loving Devotion: Enter the Mandala

“Enter the Mandala”

Asia

“Taima Mandala” (1300s – 1400s)

Who:  Asian Art Museum

When: Mar. 14, 2014 – Oct. 26, 2014 (Tues-Sun. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Thurs. 10 a.m. – 9 pm.)

Where: 

Asian Art Museum
200 Larkin Street
San Francisco, CA

How Much:  

  • Adults ~ $15
  • Seniors, Students, Youth ~ $10

More Information: Here.

“Mandalas are maps of Buddhist visionary worlds.

Minutely detailed and saturated with philosophical meaning, these works (most often paintings or sculptures) are a feast for the eyes and the mind—nested squares and circles are arrayed to represent the center of the cosmos and the four cardinal directions. For Buddhist practitioners, however, mandalas are not just images to view, but worlds to enter—after recreating the image in their mind’s eye, meditators imaginatively enter its realm.But is it possible to have this experience without years of meditative discipline?  

Enter the Mandala
says yes. In this exhibition, 14th-century paintings align a gallery with the cardinal directions, transforming open space into an architectural mandala—a chance to experience the images in three dimensions, to dwell in the midst of the cosmic symbols and be transported to another world. Visitors can literally “enter the mandala,” exploring places in the cosmos—and perhaps themselves—that might otherwise remain invisible. “

Coming Exhibition: Loving Devotion: Visions of Vishnu

“Loving Devotion: Visions of Vishnu”

Vishnu with Attendants, Bangladesh, 12th century, schist (stone), Collection of the Newark Museum

Vishnu with Attendants, Bangladesh, 12th century, schist (stone), Collection of the Newark Museum

Who:  BYU Museum of Art

When: Sept. 5, 2014 – Feb. 21, 2015 (Mon-Sat. 10 a.m. – 9 p.m.)

Where: 

Brigham Young University Museum of Art
North Campus Drive
Provo, Utah 84602

How Much:  Generally Free, some special exhibits require a ticket.

More Information: Here.

“Featuring a variety of exquisite art objects from the Indian subcontinent, Loving Devotion illuminates the rich heritage and symbolism of Hindu worship in the lives of believers, immersing viewers in the beliefs and culture of one of the world’s oldest and largest religions.

Focusing on images of Vishnu and Krishna that span centuries of history, the exhibition explores how bhakti (the practice of fervent, impassioned devotion to deity) influences the lives and worship of Hindu people and reveals the depth and intimacy of their relationship towards the divine.

Indeed, building a relationship with God is at the core of life’s purpose for the devoted believer, and both Vishnu, the Preserver, and his incarnation, Krishna, are highly revered deities that have both been the focus of significant bhakti worship. Through powerful images of these Gods inscribed on stone, in bronze or in paintings, worshippers and viewers alike are invited to learn that god is love and not fear, and understand how worship can evolve from practice to joyful experience of immense love and devotion. . . . .”

 

“Hidden Paintings Revealed at Ancient Temple of Angkor Wat”

“Hidden Paintings Revealed at Ancient Temple of Angkor Wat”

by Megan Gannon via “LiveScience

“Each year, millions of visitors flock to Angkor Wat, an ancient temple in modern-day Cambodia. There, they marvel at the 900-year-old towers, a giant moat and the shallow relief sculptures of Hindu gods. But what they can’t see are 200 hidden paintings on the temple walls.

New, digitally enhanced images reveal detailed murals at Angkor Wat showing elephants, deities, boats, orchestral ensembles and people riding horses — all invisible to the naked eye.

Many of the faded markings could be graffiti left behind by pilgrims after Angkor Wat was abandoned in the 15th century. But the more elaborate paintings may be relics of the earliest attempts to restore the temple, researchers said.

Painting discovery

Subtle traces of paint caught the eye of Noel Hidalgo Tan, a rock-art researcher at Australian National University in Canberra, while he was working on an excavation at Angkor Wat in 2010.

Built between A.D. 1113 and 1150, Angkor Wat stood at the center of Angkor, the capital of the Khmer Empire. The 500-acre (200 hectares) complex, one of the largest religious monuments ever erected, originally served as a Hindu temple dedicated to the god Vishnu, but was transformed into a Buddhist temple in the 14th century. (more…)