Spain

Clueless builders destroy 6,000-year-old Spanish tomb

Clueless builders destroy 6,000-year-old Spanish tomb 

by Tim MacFarlan via “Daily Mail

Clueless builders in a Spanish town accidentally destroyed a 6,000-year-old tomb they mistook for a broken picnic table and replaced it with a concrete bench. 

The embarrassing incident took place in the town of Cristovo de Cea in the region of Galacia in Spain’s north west and was described as a ‘monumental error’ by university professor. 

The ancient neolithic tomb had been designated a site of ‘cultural interest’ by the regional government of Galicia and was supposed to have been protected by Spain’s historical heritage law.

The stones mark the site of the ancient tomb in Cristovo de Cea, Galicia, in 2008 before they were removed and destroyed in an accidental act of cultural vandalism

But instead it was removed and the patch of ground on which it stood covered with a concrete slab so the ugly white bench could be installed.

The mistaken act of cultural vandalism was reported by local environmental group Grupo Ecolozista Outeiro, who wrote in a report, ‘The rolled concrete and modern picnic bench have caused irreparable damage, replacing what was a prehistoric cemetery of the first inhabitants of Cea.’

It was passed to Galicia’s public prosecutor which has opened a file on the case. It is also being investigated by the Galician Department of Culture, Education and Universities.

Juan A Barceló, a professor of prehistory at the Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona, told The Local:  ‘I was horrified when I heard this news.   

‘It is a monumental error. In Spain, no-one is allowed to take the individual decision to rebuild an historical monument, specially when it is classified in the national register, as it was.’. . . .

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Florida Sunken Treasure Discovery From 1715 Shipwreck Valued at Over $1 Million

“Florida Sunken Treasure Discovery From 1715 Shipwreck Valued at Over $1 Million”

by Kaylee Heck via “Yahoo News!

Florida treasure hunters hit the sunken treasure jackpot.

Brent Brisben — a co-founder of 1715 Fleet-Queens Jewels LLC, which has the rights to dive at the wreckage site where the gold was ultimately discovered — told ABC News that the 60 gold artifacts on the bottom of the ocean floor are valued at over $1 million.

The artifacts include 51 gold coins and 40 feet of gold chains with hand-crafted links, he said.

The centerpiece of the discovery is a single coin, given the nickname the “Tricentennial Royal,” which was destined to be delivered straight to Spanish King Phillip V, Brisben said.

This coin constitutes about half of the discovery’s expected value, with a price tag of more than $500,000, Brisben said.

The valuable find comes right before the 300-year anniversary of the 11-ship fleet sinking during a hurricane on July 31, 1715, off the Florida coast. The fleet had left from Havana, Cuba, on July 24, 1715.

Brisben said the discovery was made about a month ago, but he wanted to keep everything under wraps until the anniversary got closer.

“The work that goes on out there is not typical of what you see here today. I don’t want to call it an abrogation, but it’s what the dreams of every one of the people doing this are made of,” Brisben said at a news conference today. . . .

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Coming Exhibition: “El Greco and Modern Painting”

“El Greco and Modern Painting””

Who:  Museo Nacional del Prado

When: June 24, 2014 – Oct. 5, 2014 (Mon-Sun. 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.)

Where: 

Museo Nacional del Prado
Calle Ruiz de Alarcón 23
Madrid, Spain 28014
Tel.+34 91 330 2800

How Much:  14 € (reserve tickets online)

More Information: Here.

“On the occasion of the fourth centenary of the death of Domenico Theotocopuli, El Greco, the Museo del Prado is organizing the exhibition El Greco y la pintura moderna (El Greco and Modern Painting).

The exhibition will be one of the main commemorative events of the artist’s death and will show the deep influence that the rediscovery of El Greco had on the development of painting during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will feature a selection of twenty five works by the Cretan master, which will be shown in relation to approximately seventy five paintings and drawings by modern artists, thus revealing the complexity and richness of their connections.”

Art in Architecture: Salamanca Cathedrals

There are two famous cathedrals in Salamanca, Spain–the first is the old portion first built in the 12th century and  renovated in the 14th century.  Within are dozens of antique works of art depicted throughout the tower.  

This smaller tower was then built on out in the 16th and 18th centuries into the New Cathedrals that still stand there today.  Because the Cathedrals were built and renovated so many times, they reflect centuries of architectural styles and are an amalgam artistic history. 

by Laurenz Bobke